Because of the current uncertainty about covid, we have decided to postpone the start of live lectures for Session 164 (2021-2022) until the November meeting at the earliest.

If the covid outlook improves, we hope to be able to hold most of the later lectures as live events in the Boyd Orr Building’s lecture theatre. These talks will be recorded and may also be live-streamed. Details will be announced when they are known.

All talks will start at 7:30 pm.

9th September 2021
David Webster
Geology of Islay. This will be a Zoom talk aimed at those going on the September excursion, but all members are welcome. A link will be circulated to society members.

14th October 2021
Professor Mike Searle, University of Oxford
Tectonics and mountain building in the Himalaya
Summary

11th November 2021
Dr Neil Clark, Hunterian Museum (Retiring Presidential Address)
The Hunterian and the Geological Society of Glasgow
Summary

9th December 2021
Colin Ballantyne
Landslides, glaciation and the evolution of mountain landscapes during the Quaternary

13th January 2021
Emrys Phillips
Glaciotectonics (probably by Zoom only)

10th February 2021
Andrew Finlayson
Geo-engineering challenges in the uplands: Rest and Be Thankful, Loch Lomond

10th March 2021
Noel Williams
Big Boulders of Scotland

14th April 2021
To be announced

12th May 2021
Members’ night

Lecture summaries

14th October 2021
Professor Mike Searle, University of Oxford
Tectonics and mountain building in the Himalaya

The crash of the Indian plate into Asia is the biggest known collision in geological history, and it continues today. The result is the Himalaya and Karakoram – one of the largest mountain ranges on Earth. The Karakoram has half of the world’s highest mountains and a reputation as being one of the most remote and savage ranges of all. This talk will present a rich account of the geological forces that were involved in creating these mountain ranges. Using his personal accounts of extreme mountaineering and research in the region, he pieces together the geological processes that formed such impressive peaks.

Background reading. Mike’s book “Colliding Continents”is highly recommended.

11th November 2021
Dr Neil Clark, Hunterian Museum (Retiring Presidential Address)
The Hunterian and the Geological Society of Glasgow

The Hunterian at the University of Glasgow has long been closely associated with the Geological Society of Glasgow. It is important that we celebrate the early historical links and recognise that it has not always been smooth. From the early keepers of the Hunterian such as Henry Darwin Rogers, who refused to even join the Geological Society of Glasgow, to his successor John Young (the bad), Ethel Currie and Ian Rolfe, who all became president of the society, the Hunterian has always had an influence on the society. Where will the future of the Society take us post pandemic and is there a future for geology at the Hunterian and Glasgow?